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Monday fun

Various cartoons and images amused me last week.

First was Brookes cartoon in the Times about Greek debt:

Greek debt

And, in the same newspaper, the uneasy ride that Angela Merkel is taking with Nicholas Sarkozy as they try to steer through this disaster and his upcoming elections:


Then I found this gate on my journeys:

Forecasting stone

And thought it would be perfect for the regulators and banks to use, but with money instead of a stone:

Forecasting condition

Money is wet                    Times are bad, so lend less
Money is dry                    No one needs any, so lend more
Shadow on money         Gordon Brown is around
White on top                    Investment guys have been snorting
Can't see money             Ponzi scheme in operation
Swinging money            Casino capitalism is in operation
Money gone                    Casino capitalism has failed

But none of these can beat the image of myself as a zombie banker:

Zombie chris

Thanks to Al Davison for the artwork.




About Chris M Skinner

Chris M Skinner
Chris Skinner is best known as an independent commentator on the financial markets through his blog, the Finanser.com, as author of the bestselling book Digital Bank, and Chair of the European networking forum the Financial Services Club. He has been voted one of the most influential people in banking by The Financial Brand (as well as one of the best blogs), a FinTech Titan (Next Bank), one of the Fintech Leaders you need to follow (City AM, Deluxe and Jax Finance), as well as one of the Top 40 most influential people in financial technology by the Wall Street Journal’s Financial News. To learn more click here...

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One comment

  1. n theory, European governments are not actually paying anything for their bail-out of Greece as the 130bn euros comes in the form of loans. The money will be lent at a low rate of interest, but still above the cost of borrowing for countries like Germany and France.

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