Home / FSClub / Social media has changed society

Social media has changed society

I recently posted about how social media is changing our world, and Bill Jones commented:

"The
question is whether they change behaviour temporarily or permanently.
The evidence is that behaviour (individual or group) is changed
temporarily."

Well, here's some evidence that it is changing permanently.

The Iranian elections are taking place today and CNN ran this report:


It highlights that the leading contenders are using Facebook and more to reach out to voters, with key election websites including Emtedade Mehr and Campaign88.

In other words, as with the US elections last year, many countries now find that Facebook, Twitter and other tools are key to communicating with voters and, equally, for banks to engage with customers therefore.

More on this at our Club meeting next Tuesday, where:

• Christophe Langlois, Visible-Banking
• Matteo Rizzi, Creator of SWIFTcommunity.net
• David Birch, Digital Money 

• James Gardner, Banker Vision 

• Simon Deane-Johns, Pragmatist
• Bruce Davis, Oikonomics

debate the future of social media and its relevance to financial services.

If you want to come please register at: Member or Non-Member.

Meantime, for those who like Facebook and other social networking tools, you must watch this video clip (be aware, this is very funny but some language could be viewed as offensive in an open office environment):

About Chris M Skinner

Chris M Skinner

Chris Skinner is best known as an independent commentator on the financial markets through his blog, the Finanser.com, as author of the bestselling book Digital Bank, and Chair of the European networking forum the Financial Services Club. He has been voted one of the most influential people in banking by The Financial Brand (as well as one of the best blogs), a FinTech Titan (Next Bank), one of the Fintech Leaders you need to follow (City AM, Deluxe and Jax Finance), as well as one of the Top 40 most influential people in financial technology by the Wall Street Journal’s Financial News. To learn more click here…

Check Also

A dangerous game of whack-a-mole on the dark web

I was at a recent cybersecurity conference where the head of Europol’s European Cybercrime Centre …

  • Chris Skinner

    After a ‘rigged’ election result reinstated President Ahmadinejad, the Associated Press report:
    “The main mobile telephone network in Iran was cut in the capital Tehran Saturday evening while popular Internet websites Facebook and YouTube also appeared to be blocked.”
    This is to stop Iranians organising any form of protest.
    http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5jSPlmVgh-SfeEO9WhpOVG6Slnu0w
    However, it failed:
    “As the regime shut down other forms of communication, Twitter survived. With some remarkable results. Those rooftop chants that were becoming deafening in Tehran? A few hours ago, this concept of resistance was spread by a twitter message. Here’s the Twitter from a Moussavi supporter:
    “ALL internet & mobile networks are cut. We ask everyone in Tehran to go onto their rooftops and shout ALAHO AKBAR in protest #IranElection”
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/8099408.stm
    Meanwhile, CNN gets a massive anti-CNN movement amongst Twitter users for not reporting what was happening in Iran:
    “Many American Twitter users praised British and other international news outlets for covering the Iranian election aftermath of riots and civil unrest. The ‘#cnnfail’ tag was the third most tweeted topic on the microblogging network Saturday night. The ‘#iremember’ tag and ‘#Iranelections’ tags were first and second respectively.”
    http://mynewsjunkie.com/2009/06/13/twitter-users-shame-cnn-for-not-covering-iran-elections-riots/

  • Chris Skinner

    The situation in Iran seems to be getting much worse, with most of it being reported to the outside world via YouTube and Twitter.
    For example, I watched a few YouTube videos and found them pretty difficult to watch.
    This is an example:



    it’s hard to watch, but watchable.
    Then I was sent a link to a blog about Neda, a 16-year old girl. I read the blog entry:
    http://open.salon.com/blog/kathy_riordan/2009/06/20/her_name_was_neda
    and then clicked on the video … and couldn’t watch it.
    It was too distressing.
    Neda died on camera in front of her father.
    Iran needs a voice.
    Help it find one.
    Lobby your local political representative to ask his or her government to lobby the United Nations to place pressure on Iran to have an electoral recall and vote that is managed objectively.
    And thanks to YouTube, Twitter and more for keeping us all in touch.

  • Chris Skinner

    The situation in Iran seems to be getting much worse, with most of it being reported to the outside world via YouTube and Twitter.
    For example, I watched a few YouTube videos and found them pretty difficult to watch.
    This is an example:



    it’s hard to watch, but watchable.
    Then I was sent a link to a blog about Neda, a 16-year old girl. I read the blog entry:
    http://open.salon.com/blog/kathy_riordan/2009/06/20/her_name_was_neda
    and then clicked on the video … and couldn’t watch it.
    It was too distressing.
    Neda died on camera in front of her father.
    Iran needs a voice.
    Help it find one.
    Lobby your local political representative to ask his or her government to lobby the United Nations to place pressure on Iran to have an electoral recall and vote that is managed objectively.
    And thanks to YouTube, Twitter and more for keeping us all in touch.