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Things worth reading: 1st June 2009

Things we’re reading today include …

UK:

Reluctant clearer LCH sits round table to thrash out higher bid from consortium (Times)
Lloyds faces shareholder backlash on board pay (Guardian)
Investors blast secrecy over Rock (Guardian)
Executive bonus clawbacks catch on beyond banks (Telegraph)
FSA bonuses rise by 40pc in spite of financial crisis  (Telegraph)
FSA steps up battle against insider trading (Times)
Lords committee demands bank regulation overhaul  (Telegraph)
Treasury spending ‘at higher level than in First World War’ (Telegraph)

Non-UK:

ECB set to push ahead with version of quantitative easing (Independent)
Deficit will be tamed – Geithner  (Telegraph)
Geithner to talk trade in China (Oklahoma News)
Moscow soars as investors pile back into Russia (Financial Times)
India’s GDP Growth Beats Estimates Amid Global Slump (Bloomberg)
Moody’s puts ratings of 13 Indian banks on watch (Hindustan Times)

Economy:

Has the threat of a Great Depression vanished? (Times)

Quote of the Day:

“Directors are always biting the hand that lay the golden egg.”
Sam Goldwyn

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About Chris M Skinner

Chris M Skinner

Chris Skinner is best known as an independent commentator on the financial markets through his blog, the Finanser.com, as author of the bestselling book Digital Bank, and Chair of the European networking forum the Financial Services Club. He has been voted one of the most influential people in banking by The Financial Brand (as well as one of the best blogs), a FinTech Titan (Next Bank), one of the Fintech Leaders you need to follow (City AM, Deluxe and Jax Finance), as well as one of the Top 40 most influential people in financial technology by the Wall Street Journal’s Financial News. To learn more click here…

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