Home / Payments / Barclaycard contactless strikes again

Barclaycard contactless strikes again

Following on from their campaign using the waterslide to promote their contactless cards, Barclaycard strikes again.

This time it was a surprise that popped out as I was looking through the shelves of our local newspaper shop.

Eyeing the shelves, this week's Retail Week stood out. 

It's not a magazine I would normally buy, but there was a wrap around advert over the front page that caught my eye:

Barclaycard_1 

Mmmmm, methinks, what's this?

Barclaycard_1a

Aha, it's Barclaycard getting the contactless message out there again, this time targeting the key audience: merchants.

Barclaycard_1b 

And it's all backed up by their website which makes it sound so easy:

How accepting contactless payments helps your business

This innovative card reader lets customers pay for products that cost £10 or less, like a coffee or newspaper, in less than a second. Using contactless technology, small value transactions are processed securely at phenomenal speed, so you no longer miss out on sales because customers don't have enough change.

The benefits of going contactless

…for your business
  • Card payments of £10 and under, are processed in less than a second.
  • No authorisation, signature or PIN is required, unless cardholder details need to be verified.*
  • Reduced queues allow you to serve more customers.
  • Become the preferred retailer for contactless card users.
  • Higher spend from customers who aren't limited by the change in their pocket.
  • It uses the same secure network as chip and PIN.
…for your customers
  • They always have the correct 'change'.
  • No need to worry about PIN numbers or signatures, unless their details need verification.
  • Shorter queues as customers are served faster.
  • No contact is required, speeding up the transaction.
  • Contactless keeps a record of their spend.

A step-by-step guide to using a contactless terminal

Any debit or credit card with the Wave symbol can be used to pay for products worth £10 or less, in these simple steps:

  1. Cardholders simply touch their card to the reader and the payment is made.
  2. This contactless payment is processed through the same secure network as chip and PIN.
  3. The whole transaction is complete in under a second.

How to start accepting contactless payments

To join the revolution, all you need is a contactless reader at your checkout. It simply plugs into your existing chip and PIN terminal, for instant installation.

When other banks launch contactless payment cards, our reader will be able to accept those too, with no need to upgrade or change your terminal.

Barclaycard_2

Just after posting this, I notice the mainstream Barclays Bank were hit with the old Lebanese Loop trick. Maybe they could learn a thing or two from their innovative brother.

About Chris M Skinner

Chris M Skinner

Chris Skinner is best known as an independent commentator on the financial markets through his blog, the Finanser.com, as author of the bestselling book Digital Bank, and Chair of the European networking forum the Financial Services Club. He has been voted one of the most influential people in banking by The Financial Brand (as well as one of the best blogs), a FinTech Titan (Next Bank), one of the Fintech Leaders you need to follow (City AM, Deluxe and Jax Finance), as well as one of the Top 40 most influential people in financial technology by the Wall Street Journal’s Financial News. To learn more click here…

Check Also

How difficult is financial inclusion?

There were lots and lots and lots, literally, of focus upon mobile and financial inclusion …

  • Alan

    Well, here I am in Café Nero, having once again paid for a cup of tea with my contactless card. As on every previous occasion when I have used the card, it has taken 4 or 5 attempts to get the reader to accept it. The staff nearly always want me to use the traditional reader with a PIN because that usually works first time. The reading process has to be made more reliable if the contactless method of payment is to catch on. It’s just too confusing for most people at present.
    The only other retailer I know that is supposed to take the contactless card is the National Trust. I have never been able to work out how to use their reader, and none of their staff knows how either. Most of them say it is not a contactless reader (even though it has ‘contactless’ written on it) and I am beginning to think they are right.
    I can’t see this technology being acceptable unless it is improved.

  • Alan

    Well, here I am in Café Nero, having once again paid for a cup of tea with my contactless card. As on every previous occasion when I have used the card, it has taken 4 or 5 attempts to get the reader to accept it. The staff nearly always want me to use the traditional reader with a PIN because that usually works first time. The reading process has to be made more reliable if the contactless method of payment is to catch on. It’s just too confusing for most people at present.
    The only other retailer I know that is supposed to take the contactless card is the National Trust. I have never been able to work out how to use their reader, and none of their staff knows how either. Most of them say it is not a contactless reader (even though it has ‘contactless’ written on it) and I am beginning to think they are right.
    I can’t see this technology being acceptable unless it is improved.

  • Chris Skinner

    Interesting Alan
    I’ve used it a few times and had no issues like this. And the good news is that many other retailers are about to take this on board, with Barclaycard focusing upon large stores like Tesco, Boots and WHSmith for the next wave of take-up. So watch out, it’s all coming soon …
    Chris

  • Chris Skinner

    Interesting Alan
    I’ve used it a few times and had no issues like this. And the good news is that many other retailers are about to take this on board, with Barclaycard focusing upon large stores like Tesco, Boots and WHSmith for the next wave of take-up. So watch out, it’s all coming soon …
    Chris

  • Bungi

    I had an amazing experience. But, yes, the staff sometimes get a bit nervous. So critical that staff can confidently use and hence endorse the reader. It is incredibly fast, though, and I can see this being a real queue buster at high traffic times and locations.

  • Alan

    I’m a supporter of the contactless method of payment, but I worry that hitches may prevent its widespread adoption, and I hoped that my comment (above) would be read by people in the trade who are able to affect how staff are trained, and how the public are informed about how to use the system.
    Although it is important that a transaction should not take noticeably longer than giving cash and receiving change, the real advantages to my mind are: firstly not having to receive and then spend small coins (whose only convenient use seems to be in parking meters); secondly not having to have the ‘right’ change when confronted with a machine demanding payment; and thirdly not having the inconvenience of typing in a PIN.
    There is a noticeable technophobia in the British public, especially when it comes to anything replacing paper and metal money. People (and newspapers) will be quick to mock any system that promises convenience but instead delivers inconvenience. Caffé Nero is quite a good start, although I was pointing out that they do have difficulties. The National Trust is an example of the sort of introduction that could be disaster, where the readers do not appear to work and no one seems to know whether it is even supposed to work, and certainly does not know how to use it. I hope everyone in the industry concerned with introducing these systems makes sure that the retail staff are well enough trained to make the systems work smoothly. Otherwise this method of payment will go the way of the 1990’s Mondex experiment and other past, and almost forgotten, payment systems. Most people don’t see anything wrong with paper and metal cash. Barclaycard and others have an uphill task trying to persuade people that electronic payment of small amounts is better than cash.

  • Alan

    I’m a supporter of the contactless method of payment, but I worry that hitches may prevent its widespread adoption, and I hoped that my comment (above) would be read by people in the trade who are able to affect how staff are trained, and how the public are informed about how to use the system.
    Although it is important that a transaction should not take noticeably longer than giving cash and receiving change, the real advantages to my mind are: firstly not having to receive and then spend small coins (whose only convenient use seems to be in parking meters); secondly not having to have the ‘right’ change when confronted with a machine demanding payment; and thirdly not having the inconvenience of typing in a PIN.
    There is a noticeable technophobia in the British public, especially when it comes to anything replacing paper and metal money. People (and newspapers) will be quick to mock any system that promises convenience but instead delivers inconvenience. Caffé Nero is quite a good start, although I was pointing out that they do have difficulties. The National Trust is an example of the sort of introduction that could be disaster, where the readers do not appear to work and no one seems to know whether it is even supposed to work, and certainly does not know how to use it. I hope everyone in the industry concerned with introducing these systems makes sure that the retail staff are well enough trained to make the systems work smoothly. Otherwise this method of payment will go the way of the 1990’s Mondex experiment and other past, and almost forgotten, payment systems. Most people don’t see anything wrong with paper and metal cash. Barclaycard and others have an uphill task trying to persuade people that electronic payment of small amounts is better than cash.