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Regulation

Why regulators find it so hard to regulate

I hosted a fascinating dinner last night which built upon the comments made yesterday about regulators being unable to regulate. The theme was around how to make the G20 supervisory framework work with regulators, compliance heads, bank directors and a CIO in attendnace. All in all a nice crowd, and …

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Can regulators really regulate?

I blogged a while ago about David Doyle, expert on all things in finance with a Brussels flavour. David and I regularly tag-team on MiFID and the PSD, and in the wider context of Europe's Financial Services Action Plan. In particular, he has an inside track on all this stuff …

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The G20 party is over … or is it?

So the G20 meeting is over and has an agreement to spend over $1 trillion through the IMF on nations that are worthy. The other key agreements include: a lockdown on the tax regimes of countries where people hide place their wealth. The age of bank ‘secrecy’ is over they …

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A banker’s bonus ain’t what it used to be …

The Financial Stability Forum published their principles on reservering, crisis management and banker's compensation yesterday.  Here are the headlines: Recommendations and principles to strengthen financial systems On 2 April 2009, the Financial Stability Forum (FSF) issued reports covering: Recommendations for Addressing Procyclicality in the Financial System; Principles for Cross-border Cooperation …

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A banker’s bonus ain’t what it used to be …

The Financial Stability Forum published their principles on reservering, crisis management and banker's compensation yesterday.  Here are the headlines: Recommendations and principles to strengthen financial systems On 2 April 2009, the Financial Stability Forum (FSF) issued reports covering: Recommendations for Addressing Procyclicality in the Financial System; Principles for Cross-border Cooperation …

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SEPA and the PSD: broken but not dead

I haven't written much about SEPA, the Single Euro Payments Area, lately because there's not been much to update although the last time I did, I asked the question: "Are SEPA and the PSD completely broken?" However, there is now some news as I was with Gerard Hartsink in Hong …

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SEPA and the PSD: broken but not dead

I haven't written much about SEPA, the Single Euro Payments Area, lately because there's not been much to update although the last time I did, I asked the question: "Are SEPA and the PSD completely broken?" However, there is now some news as I was with Gerard Hartsink in Hong …

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FSA Liquidity Regs – Threat to London Banks’ Global Role?

Tom Groenfeldt attended our recent meeting of the Financial Services Club, where the new FSA Liquidity Rules were debated.  Here’s his report:   The FSA’s new rules on liquidity management threaten to overload banks with reporting that the regulator won’t be able to understand while missing the source of the …

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Jim Cramer vs Jon Stewart, Round Three and KO

In what began a week ago as an attack on CNBC's Business News coverage and escalated into a head-to-head battle between CNBC's Stock Market pundit Jim Cramer and Comedy Central's Jon Stewart, came to what seemed to be a conclusion on Thursday night as Cramer made a personal appearance on …

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The biggest barrier is our legacy mentality

On regular occasions I talk about disruptive models of banking and payments, such as complementary currencies, the new European Exchanges, Paypal, Zopa and SmartyPig. The aim is to illustrate that there is the potential to do banking without banks. This is not to say that I believe people want to …

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Building Societies hate our compensation scheme

I blogged recently about the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS) being a method of robbing the prudent to protect the irrational.  The blog was motivated by discussions with our Building Societies (thrifts) who are comlaining that this is a tax levied upon building societies, who own many of the major …

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Building Societies hate our compensation scheme

I blogged recently about the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS) being a method of robbing the prudent to protect the irrational.  The blog was motivated by discussions with our Building Societies (thrifts) who are comlaining that this is a tax levied upon building societies, who own many of the major …

Read More »

Building Societies hate our compensation scheme

I blogged recently about the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS) being a method of robbing the prudent to protect the irrational.  The blog was motivated by discussions with our Building Societies (thrifts) who are comlaining that this is a tax levied upon building societies, who own many of the major …

Read More »